SIMON EYRE

 

Here is yet another interview. This time with the co-founder of Second Image, Simon Eyre:

Are you still involved in the music industry at present?

Yes, I’m still a professional guitarist. I do sessions and gigs and I also teach at schools, academies and privately.

How did you get started in the music business?

I was playing in bands in my home town of Sheffield and realised that it was possible to make a living out of music. I made a decision to move down to London and meet as many industry people as I could and go to as many auditions as possible.

Who are your musical heroes?

Django Reinhardt, Jeff Beck, Larry Carlton, Frank Zappa.

Which instruments can you play?

Guitar Bass Keyboards.

As a founding member, how did you meet the other members of Second Image?

A mutual friend introduced me to Junior (Bromfield) just when they were looking for a lead guitarist.

Are you still in touch with any of them?

Yes all of them, I still do gigs with Weston, I did a lot of Matt Bianco gigs with Mark and of course I played on Georgie’s last two Groove Association albums and I’ll be playing the Jazz Café gig with them on April 23rd.

Do you know what any of the others are doing at present?

Frank (Burke) lives in Spain, he’s doing gigs as a singer, Lloyd (Dwyer) works in publishing, Junior teaches martial arts, Mark (Fisher) is half of Matt Bianco, Weston (Foster) gigs and produces.

Who came up with the name Second Image?

I believe it was Junior.

Which songs, did you write for the band?

Which songs, did you write for the band?

I co-wrote the first five singles, also There She Goes, Searching but not Finding, and Love Turns me Upside down.

How did you get the chance to appear on the Freddie Starr’s Showcase TV talent show?

Robbie Vincent sorted that out.

Besides DJ Robbie Vincent becoming your manager after you won, what else happened?

Robbie was already our manager. After we won, the BBC gave us three or four other TV appearances but never gave us our own show like they promised. If that happened now, we would have sued them for breach of contract!!

What memories do you have of your time with Robbie Vincent?

All good! He’s a man with a good heart and a passion for music.

When you moved to Polydor, did you work with any of your label mates such as Level 42?

We supported Level 42 a couple of times but Polydor didn’t really have a clue how to market us.

What was working with Roy Carter and Pete Wingfield from the Olympic Runners like?

Roy Carter tried to get involved in the playing side of it a bit too much for my liking, he would overdub instruments while we weren’t there.

Rod Temperton of Heatwave wrote Lights Out

on the band’s final LP. Did you get to meet him?

Yes we spent a week in the studio with him routining and recording Lights Out he has an almost fanatical attention to detail.

Who wrote Can’t Keep Holding On?

David Grant.

How well did the single do?

It didn’t make top 30 but it sold well and it’s one song people remember.

What was your most successful single?

In terms of sales, probably Don’t You.

When did the group disband?

I left in 1985 to form a band with Camelle Hinds from Central Line, they (Second Image) didn’t continue after that.

Was it a great feeling to be back with the band, for the O2 reunion concert in 2011?

It was like coming home, they’re my brothers!

Was there much preparation / rehearsal time beforehand?

We had three days but we spent most of that time, chatting reminiscing and laughing!

Going on tour with Womack & Womack and the late great Jimmy Ruffin must have been amazing. What do you remember about those occasions?

It was fantastic playing those great classic songs and hearing all the stories from the golden age of Motown. The Womacks were lovely people but let’s just say Jimmy Ruffin had issues and leave it there!

How did you get the gig with the Style Council?

Paul Weller had heard my guitar playing on something or other and when he was looking for a guitarist to play the tricky bits live, I was called down to meet him. The audition lasted about two minutes and then he said “Go and see me Dad!”